Employment & Skills

Employment & Skills

Introduction

Bradford’s labour market does not perform well against sub-regional and national averages and when compared to our statistical neighbours. Although the labour market has improved since the recession the June 2015 employment rate is still lower than it was 10 years ago.

Unemployment and worklessness are high in Bradford. Youth unemployment continues to be a concern. Numbers peaked in June 2005 at 5775 - the latest figures in September 2016  show that numbers have fallen to 1,045 which is a big improvement but still high when compared to our statistical neighbours. Long- term unemployment continues to be a concern with 2,355 claimants claiming for longer than 12 months . An analysis of long term claimants shows that older age groups are more likely to be affected with 42% of these claimants in the 50-64 age group .There are also large numbers of people in Bradford who are out of work due to physical or mental health issues .Recent figures show that more than 17,000 in Bradford are economically Inactive due to being classed as long term sick.

Unemployment is not a major issue in all parts of the District. The highest concentrations of out of work residents can be found within inner urban areas of Bradford such as City ward , Bowling and  Barkerend and Manningham, Keighley and outlying housing estates also have high unemployment.

Bradford’s working age population has lower than average qualification levels. There are 26% of people in Bradford with NVQ Level 4 or above qualification compared to the national figure of 37%.

Bradford has a higher proportion of residents employed in lower-skilled jobs than average, and the competition for these jobs is highest . There are 25% of people in Bradford in lower skilled jobs compared to the national average of 17%.

Both the occupational structure and the low skills levels of our residents contribute to a’ low skill low wage economy. The average wage for full time workers in Bradford is £451 compared to the national average wage of £530.

Under-employment is also a growing issue with an increase in part time working. This reflects the slow rate of jobs growth and a drop in the number of job vacancies since before the recession.

Key Messages

  1. Bradford’s labour market does not perform well against sub-regional and national averages when compared to our statistical neighbours. Although the labour market has improved since the recession the September 2016  employment rate of 65.1%  is still lower than the pre recession  2008 rate of 69.1% in
  2. Unemployment and worklessness are high in Bradford. Youth unemployment continues to be a concern. Numbers peaked in June 2005 at 5775 - the latest figures in September 2016 show that numbers have fallen to 1,045 which is a big improvement but still high when compared to our statistical neighbours. Long- term unemployment continues to be a concern with 2,355  long term claimants in September 2016 . An analysis of long term claimants shows that older age groups are more likely to be affected with 42% of these claimants in the 50-64 age group .There are also large numbers of people in Bradford who are out of work due to physical or mental health issues .Recent figures show that more than 17,000 in Bradford are economically Inactive due to being classed as long term sick.
  3. Unemployment is not a major issue in all parts of the District. The highest concentrations of out of work residents can be found within inner urban areas of Bradford such as Bowling, Barkerend and Manningham. Keighley and outlying housing estates also have high unemployment.
  4. Bradford’s working age population has lower than average qualification levels.
  5. Bradford has a higher proportion of residents employed in lower-skilled jobs than average, and the competition for these jobs is highest
  6. Both the occupational structure and the low skills levels of our residents contribute to a’ low skill low wage economy.

Under-employment is also a growing issue with an increase in part time working. This reflects the slow rate of jobs growth and a drop in the number of job vacancies since before the recession

Related data & documents

Intel bulletin employment and skills

Files on Bradford.gov.uk;

www.bradford.gov.uk/economic intelligence / monthly unemployment update

www.bradford.gov.uk/economic intelligence/ out of work benefits claimants

www.bradford.gov.uk/economic intelligence/youth unemployment update

www.bradford.gov.uk/economic intelligence / labour market update

 

Contact details

Understanding Bradford District
5th Floor, Britannia House
Hall Ings
Bradford
BD1 1HX

Phone : 01274 434565 - Monday to Friday 09:00 to 17:00 (GMT)
Email : observatory@bradford.gov.uk

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